Wall Mounted Fish Storage by Ray Carnes

 

 

Description

My studio is too small to accommodate a floor-mounted fish storage stand, so I designed a more space-saving device to keep the carvings safe without giving up precious floor space. This design was easy to make, and a trip to Home Depot only set me back about $30.00. It provides four storage racks, but itís easily altered to meet your needs. 

Materials

Note: All materials are ĺ inch PVC. 

HINT: Some PVC connectors have threads inside one or more openings. These things frequently get misplaced in the wrong bins, so check each one to be sure there are no threads Ė just smooth plastic so the pipe will fit into it. 

3     Pipes (10 feet long). These will be cut up into lengths that are noted in the directions. I highly recommend using a chop saw. It pretty much guarantees accuracy, and it certainly speeds up the process. If you do, let the blade stop completely before raising it. If you donít, the pipe will be chipped and the bits will go flying. Not a good thing, so be safe.

 

The Frame

4     90-degree connectors (top & bottom frame corners)

4     T connectors (top & bottom middle frame corners)

1     Cross connector Ė shaped like a ď+Ē - (middle of the frame)

12    T connectors (holding arm connectors) 

12   12-inch pipes

6     3-inch pipes

6     5-inch pipes

 

The Fish Holding Arms

12    90-degree connectors (vertical-end holding arms)

12    end caps (end of arms) 

12    9-inch pipes (horizontal support pipes )

12    3-inch pipes (vertical support pipes)

 

Other Stuff

4   Pipe holders to fasten to the wall

        Foam pipe insulation (as shown on the finished project)

        PVC primer and adhesive

        Latex or nitrile (blue) gloves (unless you like purple fingers)

        Spray paint. Iím a sloppy PVC gluer-upper, and this stuff helps.

 

Directions

Cutting schedule

 12 @ 12 inches

 6  @  5 inches

12 @  9 inches

18 @  3 inches

 

Dry Assemble The Base structure

The base structure is that portion of the rack that rests on the wall. Basically, itís everything except the arms that will support the fish. For now, weíre only concerned with the base, and weíll deal with the arms later.

1.                 Use sandpaper to remove any burrs on the pipe ends.

2.                 Remove any dirt, grease, etc. from the pipes.

3.
             Construct the left side structure as shown. From top to bottom it has:
90-degree connector facing to the right,
3-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
5-inch pipe,
T connector - facing right,
5-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
 3-inch pipe, and
90-degree connector facing to the right.


 

4.                 Construct the left side structure as shown. From top to bottom it has:
90-degree connector facing to the left,
3-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
5-inch pipe,
T connector facing left,
5-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
3-inch pipe, and
90-degree connector facing to the left.

 

5.                 Construct middle structure as shown. This is different from the left and right sides. As you can see, the center of this structure is a cross connector that lends structural stability to the entire base. From top to bottom it has:
T connector,
3-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
5-inch pipe,
cross connector,
5-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
12-inch pipe,
T connector for holding arm - facing out,
3-inch pipe, and
T connector.


 

6.                 Add 6 12-inch horizontal pipes to attach the left, center, and right structures

 

7.                 Review the base structure, adjusting where necessary

 

Glue Up The Base structure

Note:  All of the joints are to be glued, EXCEPT the out-facing T connectors in the middle structure. This allows those four arms to swivel to best support carvings of varying sizes.

 

NOTE: If youíre new to PVC, hereís how itís done.

               Use sandpaper to remove any burrs on the pipe ends.

               Remove any dirt, grease, etc. from the pipes.

             You will have two small cans. One contains primer and the other contains the adhesive. Each has a dauber attached to the inside of the cap.

             Coat the inside of the connector and the end of the pipe.

             Wait a few seconds, making sure that none of it has pooled in the connector.

             Immediately apply the adhesive to the inside of the corrector and, using a twisting motion.

             Push the pipe into it until it hits the end.

             Make any corrections immediately, because it sets up very quickly.

             I suggest that you try a couple of test joints to be sure youíre comfortable with the process.

 

1.     Remove the six horizontal pipes, isolating the left side structure, the right side structure and the middle structure.

 

2.     On a flat surface, begin removing and adhering one piece at a time.

 

3.     Add the six horizontal pipes, one joint at a time.

 

Assembling The Supporting Arms

Note: The twelve supporting arms do not have to be glued up. I didnít.

 

Assemble each supporting arm as follows:

1.            Attach a 9-inch pipe to a 90-degree connector.

2.            Attach a 3-inch pipe to the 90-degree connector.

3.            Attach a cap to the 3-inch pipe.

 

Insert The Arms

Insert a supporting arm in each of the twelve out-facing T connectors.

 

Paint

If youíre a PVC gluing klutz (just like me), and if youíre a neat-knick (just like me), then you might want to cover all those ugly purple drips with paint. I used Krylon Fusion For Plastic. It really does fuse to the pipes and connectors, but you really do need to wait until the entire structure is finished and ready to be hung on the wall. The reason is that getting paint into the connectors or on the pipe ends will make insertion impossible. HINT: I should have purchased two cans, but it looks okay, so I didnít get too obsessive about it.

 

Hang It On The Wall

There are two kinds of U-shaped wall straps for ĺ-inch pipe. One is metal and the other is plastic. I opted for the plastic, and it seems to work just fine. I used two on the top rail and two on the middle, as shown.

 

Protect The Fish

I used Frost King Polyethylene Foam Pipe Insulation on each of the supporting arms. I purchased it from Home Depot, but itís widely available. Mine came in a four-pack totaling 12 feet of insulation. It was enough for me, but, if you have supporting arms longer than mine, you may need more.

 

Because some of my fish are too short to span the supporting arms, I fitted a piece of scrap ľ-inch plywood to fit on the three upper arms. That works well, but itís even better after I glued felt on one side. I helps to protect the finish better than bare wood.

 

You Did It

Congratulations, now youíve got a space-conscious, semi-attractive, and very useful gizmo to warehouse your carvings. If you have any questions, suggestions  or corrections, please feel free to contact me at rcarnes6@comcast.net.

 

Ray Carnes

 

     

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